Friday, November 23, 2012

Little House on the Prairie by Laura Ingalls Wilder

Little House on the Prairie (Little House, #2)Little House on the Prairie by Laura Ingalls Wilder
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

This book is crazy to read as an adult. It's largely about the white settlers breaking treaties with the Native Americans and expanding Westward into their territory. Of course, I missed the importance of all this when I read it as a kid obviously. It's definitely worth an adult-reread. The father moves the family from Wisconsin to future Kansas over treacherous terrain and then builds a new house from scratch, including all the furniture. Unfortunately, he builds the house basically on top of a Native American trail so they proceed to have a lot of interesting interactions with numerous different tribes.

I'd give it 5 stars now, but I'm sticking with my childhood rating of 4. (I kept a reading journal as a kid. Are you surprised?)

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Thursday, November 22, 2012

Simply Irresistible by Jill Shalvis

Simply Irresistible (Lucky Harbor, #1)Simply Irresistible by Jill Shalvis
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

The literary equivalent of chocolate bonbons for your brain. This book is no stress. Just a happy little romance. There's also some heartwarming sister-reunion stuff.

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Monday, November 19, 2012

The Ironwood Tree by Holly Black and Tony DiTerlizzi

The Ironwood Tree (The Spiderwick Chronicles, #4)The Ironwood Tree by Holly Black and Tony DiTerlizzi
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Guess it's getting a little repetitive now without delightful twists or turns to make it more entertaining for an adult. Aspects of Snow White in this one, but not a lot of fairy fun.

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Sunday, November 18, 2012

Lucinda's Secret by Holly Black and Tony DiTerlizzi

Lucinda's Secret (The Spiderwick Chronicles, #3)Lucinda's Secret by Holly Black and Tony DiTerlizzi
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

This filled in a little background information about the childrens' aunt Lucinda and her father who made the Field Guide. While it progressed the narrative, nothing was really resolved in this one and the ending left a little still in the air. Definitely not a stand-alone book.

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Friday, November 16, 2012

The Field Guide by Holly Black and Tony DiTerlizzi

The Field Guide (The Spiderwick Chronicles, #1)The Field Guide by Holly Black and Tony DiTerlizzi
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I like that the characters are not the typical children's book characters. I like that the older sister Mallory is a tough girl without being the one that gets in trouble. It would be nice if she had interests besides fencing, but at least fencing is interesting. I like that the typically "nerdy" sibling Simon isn't actually nerdy but a vaguely obsessive animal-lover. Interested to see how Jared develops. Sounds like he might be interested in art.

The story itself is pretty cute though still maybe a little scary for little ones. This one is a little unresolved- it's more of an introduction to the characters and their situation in a house filled with magic.

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Wednesday, November 14, 2012

Zen Mind, Beginner's Mind by Shunryu Suzuki

Zen Mind, Beginner's Mind: Informal Talks on Zen Meditation and PracticeZen Mind, Beginner's Mind: Informal Talks on Zen Meditation and Practice by Shunryu Suzuki
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I took a Buddhism class in college and this was part of our required reading. At the time, it made no sense to me. This is because this book did not explain how to meditate. Since then, I've read books about how to meditate, I've attempted meditation (hundreds of times at this point), and I've read about consciousness. So now it makes sense. Even so, it was a horrible choice for an introductory Buddhism course with no discussion of meditation. It's also a poor book if you haven't already learned about meditation and attempted it, especially because he doesn't give any explicit directions about meditation beyond sitting in the correct posture. Meditation itself is barely implied. You only know that what he's talking about if you already have a background in it.

There's no explanation of how Zen is a school of (East Asian) Mahayana Buddhism, or that there are even branches of Buddhism with different beliefs. Is zazen just another word for meditation or is there something unique about it? Meditation with no purpose? I can't really figure it out from the text. You will acquire something from this practice but you can't practice it in order to acquire something or it is not zazan? Ah, koans even where we don't expect them. "Intellectually my talk makes no sense." Well, I agree with that.

Despite the name, this is an intermediate or advanced meditation book, with an emphasis on zen practice specifically which like I said is just one kind. There are some interesting thoughts here worth considering. Some of it reminds me a lot of Christianity.

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Monday, November 12, 2012

Self-Reliance by Ralph Waldo Emerson

Self-RelianceSelf-Reliance by Ralph Waldo Emerson
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

As for the first half of the essay: If you are an excellent person and follow the advice in this essay, then it's probably going to work out well. If you're a horrible person, or if you think you're an excellent person but you're really kind of a low-grade specimen, and follow this essay, it's a recipe to be a huge jerk.

I like the second half of the essay better. I appreciate it's anti-consumerist bent. Even it's anti-technology section has some good points.

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Sunday, November 11, 2012

Little House in the Big Woods by Laura Ingalls Wilder

Little House in the Big Woods (Little House, #1)Little House in the Big Woods by Laura Ingalls Wilder
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Takes place in the semi-wilderness of 1870s in Wisconsin, US. Takes us through a year in the life of a middle sister age 4 (celebrates her 5th birthday during the book). There are at least 4 stories just about bears in this book.

I think I like this book even better as an adult. It's like a survival guide for the zombie apocalypse or a pandemic.

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Thursday, November 1, 2012

A Visit from the Goon Squad by Jennifer Egan

A Visit from the Goon SquadA Visit from the Goon Squad by Jennifer Egan
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I love the first chapter, and I probably would have been happy to read a novel about just the first character. Still, I liked how the novel moved around a group of friends and acquaintances and their different perspectives on each other, music, and life as time passed. And since the first character was my favorite, I was glad to see how she'd changed with age in a subsequent chapter. Her transformation was totally believable.

As many other people have commented, this is pretty much a short story collection with overlapping characters and themes, but I love short story collections, so that definitely wasn't a problem for me.

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Thursday, October 25, 2012

Yoga for Physical and Mental Fitness by Sachindra K. Majundar

Introduction to YogaIntroduction to Yoga by Sachindra K. Majundar
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Actually, my copy is called Yoga for Physical and Mental Fitness, but I think it’s the same book. It has photographs of yoga poses and explanations of how it ties in with meditation.

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Monday, October 1, 2012

A Gate at the Stairs by Lorrie Moore

A Gate at the StairsA Gate at the Stairs by Lorrie Moore
My rating: 2 of 5 stars

I like Lorrie Moore's short stories so I really wanted to like this novel, but no. The bones of the book is good. Her relationship with her employer is very realistic and the dynamics between the two of them and the baby are very realistic and interesting. The husband is an interesting villain but completely without any nuance. Her brother seems a little outside the story, but okay, whatever. But the worst part in the story is the boyfriend. He would have been so much better without the (sort of a spoiler alert) dramatic twist. Totally over the top and not realistic at all. Finally, the ending where she addresses the reader directly is not sassy or cute, it's awful.

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Thursday, September 27, 2012

Boundaries in Marriage by Henry Cloud, John Townsend

Boundaries in MarriageBoundaries in Marriage by Henry CloudJohn Townsend 
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Christian advice on marriage. Not terrible advice even if you're not Christian (or are Christian but are dubious of Biblical marriage advice). Focuses on how to respect each other and cultivate real love based on mutual respect and empathy. There was nothing novel for me but clearly, a lot of people could benefit from these views.

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Tuesday, August 7, 2012

The Warlord of Mars by Edgar Rice Burroughs

The Warlord of Mars (Barsoom, #3)The Warlord of Mars by Edgar Rice Burroughs
My rating: 2 of 5 stars

I was hoping that the third book in this series would rescue all the time I'd invested on the first two, but it felt like a repeat of the second one, except that I preferred the second one.

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Monday, July 30, 2012

The Omnivore's Dilemma by Michael Pollan

The Omnivore's Dilemma: A Natural History of Four MealsThe Omnivore's Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals by Michael Pollan
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

When I first read this book in 2007, I gave it 4 stars. Since then I've read other books on the farming-industrial complex, and on a reread I found a lot to appreciate about this book in particular. It's a well-researched, thorough look at different ways we can choose to eat an omnivore diet. It talks about the corn industry, the chicken/egg industry, the beef industry, small sustainable farms and farmers' markets, and hunting and gathering in America.

My reread reminded me to pay more attention to what I'm eating since after 10 years I've slipped back a little to including some processed foods in our diet again.

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Thursday, July 26, 2012

A Study in Scarlet by Arthur Conan Doyle

A Study in ScarletA Study in Scarlet by Arthur Conan Doyle
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I first read this when I was 12, and apparently, I loved it then, so I'll leave the five stars I gave it back then. I reread it as an adult because my dad had The Complete Sherlock Holmes and it's the first in the collection. Maybe more of a 4 star, because seriously why is this story all over Utah, and why doesn't the murderer just use a fake name? But delightful in its vengefulness.

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Wednesday, July 25, 2012

The Gods of Mars by Edgar Rice Burroughs

The Gods of Mars (Barsoom, #2)The Gods of Mars by Edgar Rice Burroughs
My rating: 2 of 5 stars

I was bored. I wanted John Carter to find Dejah Thoris and make this into a romance instead of an adventure/ pulp sci fi. Maybe I would have preferred it be more fantasy-sci fi, with more emphasis on a magical world or fantastic technologies... or anything. I don't know. It took me forever to read because I was so bored, and my eyes would glaze over entire paragraphs.

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Some very on-point blog posts

A nice little post on how to decide which books to keep and which to donate.

"All you have to do is look at something and see how it makes you feel. If your initial reaction is sadness or guilt or indifference, you don’t keep it. If it makes you feel glad, you keep it. Simple, yes, but effective."
http://smallnotebook.org/2012/07/17/declutter-the-reading-list/

Although, I'm not sure if I actually agree, since looking at my dad's books does make me sad, but I definitely want to keep them, but maybe I can loosely apply this idea.

And a blog that posts photos of New Yorkers reading on the subway! I don't ride the subway much anymore, but when I did, I spent most of the time reading.
http://undergroundnewyorkpubliclibrary.com/

Tuesday, July 24, 2012

Polling and the Public by Herbert B. Asher

Polling and the Public: What Every Citizen Should KnowPolling and the Public: What Every Citizen Should Know by Herbert B. Asher
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

This is actually one of my graduate school books, so I figured I would review it before getting rid of it. Since it's 11 years old now, it's probably better to read more recent editions of the book. The main points of the book are probably the same, but newer editions might have more recent examples and perhaps review more advanced poll-taking technology and analysis.

The main points are not that enlightening. Polls can be useful or they can be misleading either by accident or on purpose. It might give the public a way to participate beyond elections, or it can manipulate the public.

Furthermore, some people don't care about the issues they are being polled about, and these "nonattitudes" might be misconstrued by the pollsters. Some people might care very deeply about the issue, but be undecided. Pollsters can mislead through not only question wording, but also question wording, and this is more difficult to detect.

The book also explains sampling error and types of sampling in some detail. This is useful mainly if you're planning on conducting your own poll. A 4% sampling error is usually adequate, but obviously not very determinative when 52% of respondents feel one way (really means 48-56% of respondents feel that way). The error of subsets of the sample might actually be much higher. The method of interviewing affects the results, the timing might affect the results, the release of the poll results might influence the public's actions.

Mostly, I enjoyed the political cartoons in the book. ISBN: 1-56802-582-3.

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Wednesday, July 11, 2012

Blasphemy by Douglas Preston

Blasphemy (Wyman Ford #2)Blasphemy by Douglas Preston
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Probably 3.5 stars. Started out really well but eventually I got bored of the obvious "surprise" coming and the religious war really dragged too.

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Monday, July 2, 2012

Tyrannosaur Canyon by Douglas Preston

Tyrannosaur Canyon (Wyman Ford #1)Tyrannosaur Canyon by Douglas Preston
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Maybe 3.5? I did like it. It was almost a relaxing read for an action/ adventure story. I loved the parts about dinosaurs. The government's reaction to what was happening seemed a bit of a stretch though.

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Thursday, June 28, 2012

One Perfect Word by Debbie Macomber

One Perfect Word: One Word Can Make All the DifferenceOne Perfect Word: One Word Can Make All the Difference by Debbie Macomber
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

This book is very religious, and clearly a lot of people find it inspirational. It's a pretty easy short read and I don't regret reading it.

However, I just read Bright-Sided: How the Relentless Promotion of Positive Thinking Has Undermined America and this is the exact kind of "magical thinking" she argues against.

I have a big problem with the line of thinking that goes, "pray and your prayer will be answered, unless it's not and then either 1) you didn't pray hard enough, or 2) God has a different plan we can't understand." But did you know that people have studied whether or not prayer works in medical situations?:

Analyzing complications in the 30 days after the operations, the researchers found no differences between those patients who were prayed for and those who were not.

In another of the study's findings, a significantly higher number of the patients who knew that they were being prayed for — 59 percent — suffered complications, compared with 51 percent of those who were uncertain. The authors left open the possibility that this was a chance finding. But they said that being aware of the strangers' prayers also may have caused some of the patients a kind of performance anxiety.
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/03/31/hea...

So yeah, I can't get terribly excited about Macomber's message, though I don't reject it completely either. I think that focus, meditation, and determination can have big effects on a person's life, as can luck.

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Wednesday, May 16, 2012

The Beach at Night by Elena Ferrante

The Beach at NightThe Beach at Night by Elena Ferrante
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Dark in a weird way. Very short.

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The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger

The Catcher in the RyeThe Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I read this as a kid for the first time and I was overly focused on the fact that I didn't like Holden Caulfield, and was grossed out by his poor interactions with girls and women. But as an adult appreciate the writing and the clear voice of the 16-year-old main character.

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Sunday, May 13, 2012

Nickel and Dimed by Barbara Ehrenreich

Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in AmericaNickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America by Barbara Ehrenreich
My rating: 2 of 5 stars

The thing that drove me crazy about this book is that she got mouthy with her employers and lazy at work. She's hardly the best representative of the poorest people.

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Tuesday, May 8, 2012

An Acceptable Time by Madeleine L'Engle

An Acceptable Time (A Wrinkle in Time Quintet, #5)An Acceptable Time by Madeleine L'Engle
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

You might try to read this after the fourth Wrinkle in Time book, A Swiftly Tilting Planet, but you should really read this after A House Like a Lotus (the O'Keefe series #3), which takes place chronologically right before An Acceptable Time and is somewhat necessary to understanding who Polly and Zach are. In a House Like a Lotus, Calvin and Meg are about 41 years old and have 7 children, of whom Polly is the oldest (16 years old). Polly goes on a trip to Athens during Spring session or maybe summer, where she meets a total creeper guy, Zachary, who is in his 20s.

An Acceptable Time takes place the following autumn, and it has a similar adventure as in A Swiftly Tilting Planet with the Christian themes of Many Waters. It's a pretty straight adventure story with no personal growth for any of the characters or anything else worth remarking upon. At the end, we are to believe that Zachary might experience personal growth but only after the book is over- we witness none of it.

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Saturday, April 28, 2012

Animal Farm by George Orwell

Animal FarmAnimal Farm by George Orwell
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

When I read this for school, I was exceptionally young. Sometime in middle school for sure. I barely knew anything about communist and socialist revolutions around the world, and wouldn't for many years. (We didn't even make it to the Kennedy years in History Class, possibly something to do with the years the AP exam focused on.) Years after reading the book, I recalled its contents and just sort of assumed it was anti-communist.

But I reread it recently and it's not that simple. The previous system, where the animals are slaves under the farmer, is only better in terms of animal feed and a lack of hypocrisy about the evils being committed. The ruling elite are pigs either way- whether they are the humans or the literal pigs.

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Sunday, April 15, 2012

Civil Disobedience by Henry David Thoreau

Civil DisobedienceCivil Disobedience by Henry David Thoreau
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Thoreau condemns slavery and the Mexican–American War in Civil Disobedience. He advocates breaking the law where the law advocates you being an agent of evil. He advocates abolitionists not paying their taxes. His premise is that you best express your love for your country, its government, and the law by refusing to participate in its injustice and its violence. So far, so good.

He seems to prefer not paying your taxes over using your vote for the "available" subpar candidate or petitioning the state. While perhaps this was an option in the 1800s, it appears the US government has gained a lot of power over its citizens in the last 160 years, because that's no longer an option unless you want to just rot in jail. Obviously, people were jailed even for "petitioning the government" during the Civil Rights Movement, but Thoreau seems to have avoided jail (except for one night) while not paying his taxes. Citizens appear to have gained more freedom to protest and lost the freedom to refuse to pay their taxes (unless you happen to be super rich and can just claim losses while living the good life).


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Monday, April 9, 2012

A House Like a Lotus by Madeleine L'Engle

A House Like a Lotus (O'Keefe Family, #3)A House Like a Lotus by Madeleine L'Engle
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Some light spoilers ahead, but I tried to refrain from really telling anything.

First, this book is not for kids unless you're prepared to discuss sex, consent, and people taking advantage of teens.

As background, Calvin and Meg are 41 years old now, and move back to the US for Calvin's job. They settle on another island, this time in South Carolina. Their 7 children are a little older now: Polly (16 years old), Charles (14), Sandy "Zan" (12?), Den (10?), Peggy (8), Johnny (6), and Rosie (4).

While the whole family is mentioned, this story is mostly about Polly's "coming of age." She makes friends with a bunch of much older people in South Carolina: Maxine and Ursula who are in their 50s, and a medical intern Renny that she's dating. He's the absolute worst person in this book in my opinion, but Polly doesn't seem to notice. Max encourages her to take a trip to Athens, where she meets a total creeper guy Zachary in his 20s. He's the second or third worst person in this book. Again Polly doesn't seem to notice. Instead she focuses on being mad at Max for basically no reason at all. The story flashes back and forth between her town in South Carolina and Athens.

There are a lot of issues with this book, the biggest is that it is SO MELODRAMATIC. Maybe that's perfect for teenage girls? Another problem is the super high number of creepy characters willing to hit on 16-year-old Polly. Polly is tall, but she makes it clear that she does not look like an adult, so it's not an innocent mistake. Given that this was written in the 1980s we can't blame culture for this disaster. Another issue is that a whole bunch of new characters are introduced about 70% of the way through the book. Nope, sorry, I can't care about new people this late in the game.

Nonetheless, if I grade it on a curve, it's the best in O'Keefe series, and maybe one of the better in the bigger Kairos series (which is the 8 books in the Time quintet + O'Keefe series). There are references to great books, and there are a few deep thoughts.

More of a spoiler: Netson's Disease is fictional but I'm not sure why, as there are plenty of parasites that injure the heart. https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/artful-amoeba/americans-may-be-more-at-risk-from-deadly-heart-parasite-than-realized/

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Friday, March 30, 2012

Dragons in the Waters by Madeleine L'Engle

Dragons in the Waters (O'Keefe Family, #2)Dragons in the Waters by Madeleine L'Engle
My rating: 2 of 5 stars

Action-mystery-fantasy about a new character Simon on a freight ship to Latin America. Poly and her brother Charles are also there, but the story isn't really about them.

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Tuesday, March 27, 2012

The Arm of the Starfish by Madeleine L'Engle

The Arm of the Starfish (O'Keefe Family, #1)The Arm of the Starfish by Madeleine L'Engle


Technically this isn't part of the A Wrinkle in Time series. But it has the O'Keefe-Murry family in it, and chronologically, this falls right after A Swiftly Tilting Planet (Time #4), and about two more O'Keefe Family books before An Acceptable Time (Time #5, but also O'Keefe Family #4).

Spoiler alert: Even though the whole point of the book is that a new character Adam Edington is going to work for Calvin O'Keefe, Adam doesn't make it to the lab until about 40% of the book. When he does, he still doesn't get to work, but goes swimming with dolphins. Then a little bit of the starfish excitment, then more blah blah blah.

Also, Calvin and Meg, who are about 37 years old, have had 7 children by now. Poly (12 years old), Charles (10), Sandy (8?), Dennis (6?), Peggy (4), Johnny (2), baby Rosie a.k.a. Mary. Holy cow.

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Wednesday, March 21, 2012

The Beasts of Tarzan by Edgar Rice Burroughs

The Beasts of Tarzan (Tarzan, #3)The Beasts of Tarzan by Edgar Rice Burroughs
My rating: 2 of 5 stars

There are so many things wrong with this third book in the series. The racism everyone knows about. Though I continue to think that it's also generalized misanthropy because while the author's language is racist, the human characters are mostly all the same regardless of race. The animals are the noblest and most moral characters. Unfortunately, the animals might also be the most interesting character as all the other characters appear to be extremely one-dimensional. Also, the story dragged on so much. It could have ended several chapters before it did, but instead, the author created additional one-dimensional bad guys to oppose.

So what did I like? I liked the crazy troupe of animals. This is probably the book in the series that most inspired the cartoon Disney version of Tarzan (along with book #1). I liked that Jane gets the opportunity to be kind of bad ass in this one. I liked that there were additional good guys in this story, and I enjoyed their contributions. As for the action has everything- fighting, animals, ships, explosions.

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Wednesday, March 7, 2012

Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson

Bridge to TerabithiaBridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

It's a beautiful book but I read it in maybe 4th grade and that was too early for me. I've always been vaguely hostile about how upsetting it was at that age. Never mind that I dealt with the real death of my great grandmother around that age, I just wasn't old enough to either use art to help me process the real death or understand the art because of the real death. I wish I'd read it in 8th or 9th grade.

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Tuesday, March 6, 2012

The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway

The Old Man and the SeaThe Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

It's beautifully written. It's about love, loneliness, poverty, injustice, and just going on in lonely old age.

The first time I read this I was lukewarm about it. It was only on my second reading that I appreciated the sadness (and happiness) of it more. But it was tough to get through both times even though it's short because it's so much fishing. It's as exciting as fishing will ever be, but it's still a lot of fishing.

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Monday, March 5, 2012

The Crucible by Arthur Miller

The CrucibleThe Crucible by Arthur Miller
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

This play is moving, disturbing, and especially frightening for its realism- not just during the McCarthy era but in every scapegoat-and-"you're with us or your against us" era.

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Sunday, March 4, 2012

The War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells

The War of the WorldsThe War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

This is a fun apocalypse narrative. It's written in such a way that it makes perfect sense that people listening to it on the radio thought it was real. The ending seems a little weak in terms of believability but keeps the story fairly enjoyable.

The most amazing part is that this was written in the 1890s before human aviation.

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Tuesday, February 28, 2012

The End of the Affair by Graham Greene

The End of the AffairThe End of the Affair by Graham Greene
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

This novel has been my favorite since I read it in 2007. I think Greene is a genius. In this novel, Greene sneaks into your brain to tell a great story, and you go along for the ride feeling entertained the whole way, and then suddenly he has changed your insides forever. I'm due for a reread, but I carry this book inside me all the time anyway.

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Tuesday, January 10, 2012

Memories of My Melancholy Whores by Gabriel García Márquez

Memories of My Melancholy WhoresMemories of My Melancholy Whores by Gabriel García Márquez
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I read the Spanish version of this, Memoria de mis putas tristes. When I read this, I hadn't read Lolita yet. It's probably inspired by Lolita but it's also the exact opposite of Lolita. I thought it was a sad and beautiful story about mortality and love.

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Wednesday, January 4, 2012

Many Waters by Madeleine L'Engle

Many Waters (A Wrinkle in Time Quintet, #4)Many Waters by Madeleine L'Engle
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

This is the fourth book in the Wrinkle in Time series, though it's ctually a more well-written story than the first three books. Chronologically it takes place between book 2 and 3. When I read this as a child I gave it three stars- possibly because I was bored by it or because it focused on Sandy and Dennis instead of Meg and Charles. As an adult, my biggest objection is that it's a bit misogynistic. My secondary objection is that there's not any point in this adventure either for Sandy and Dennis or in the bigger scheme of the Wrinkle in Times Series.

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